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ⓘ Blog | Interest. Interest, in finance and economics, is payment from a borrower or deposit-taking financial institution to a lender or depositor of an amount above rep ..




                                               

A Game of Thrones (disambiguation)

A Game of Thrones is the first novel in George R. R. Martins fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire. A Game of Thrones or Game of Thrones may also refer to:

                                               

The Lord of the Rings

The Lord of the Rings is an epic high-fantasy novel written by English author and scholar J. R. R. Tolkien. The story began as a sequel to Tolkiens 1937 fantasy novel The Hobbit, but eventually developed into a much larger work. Written in stages between 1937 and 1949, The Lord of the Rings is one of the best-selling novels ever written, with over 150 million copies sold. The title of the novel refers to the storys main antagonist, the Dark Lord Sauron, who had in an earlier age created the One Ring to rule the other Rings of Power as the ultimate weapon in his campaign to conquer and rule all of Middle-earth. From quiet beginnings in the Shire, a hobbit land not unlike the English countryside, the story ranges across Middle-earth, following the course of the War of the Ring through the eyes of its characters, most notably the hobbits Frodo, Sam, Merry and Pippin. Although generally known to readers as a trilogy, the work was initially intended by Tolkien to be one volume of a two-volume set, the other to be The Silmarillion, but this idea was dismissed by his publisher. For economic reasons, The Lord of the Rings was published in three volumes over the course of a year from 29 July 1954 to 20 October 1955. The three volumes were titled The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers and The Return of the King. Structurally, the novel is divided internally into six books, two per volume, with several appendices of background material included at the end. Some editions combine the entire work into a single volume. The Lord of the Rings has since been reprinted numerous times and translated into 38 languages. Tolkiens work has been the subject of extensive analysis of its themes and origins. Although a major work in itself, the story was only the last movement of a larger epic Tolkien had worked on since 1917, in a process he described as mythopoeia. Influences on this earlier work, and on the story of The Lord of the Rings, include philology, mythology, religion and the authors distaste for the effects of industrialization, as well as earlier fantasy works and Tolkiens experiences in World War I. The Lord of the Rings in its turn is considered to have had a great effect on modern fantasy; the impact of Tolkiens works is such that the use of the words "Tolkienian" and "Tolkienesque" has been recorded in the Oxford English Dictionary. The enduring popularity of The Lord of the Rings has led to numerous references in popular culture, the founding of many societies by fans of Tolkiens works, and the publication of many books about Tolkien and his works. The Lord of the Rings has inspired, and continues to inspire, artwork, music, films and television, video games, board games, and subsequent literature. Award-winning adaptations of The Lord of the Rings have been made for radio, theatre, and film. In 2003, it was named Britains best novel of all time in the BBCs The Big Read. In 2015, the BBC ranked The Lord of the Rings 26th on its list of the 100 greatest British novels.

                                               

Harry Potter (character)

Harry James Potter is the titular protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. The majority of the books plot covers seven years in the life of the orphan Harry, who, on his eleventh birthday, learns he is a wizard. Thus, he attends Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry to practice magic under the guidance of the kindly headmaster Albus Dumbledore and other school professors along with his best friends Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger. Harry also discovers that he is already famous throughout the novels magical community, and that his fate is tied with that of Lord Voldemort – the internationally feared Dark Wizard and murderer of his parents, Lily and James. The film and book series revolve around Harrys struggle to adapt to the wizarding world and defeat Voldemort. Harry is considered a fictional icon and has been described by many critics, readers, and audiences as one of the greatest literary and film characters of all time.

                                               

Interest (emotion)

Interest is a feeling or emotion that causes attention to focus on an object, event, or process. In contemporary psychology of interest, the term is used as a general concept that may encompass other more specific psychological terms, such as curiosity and to a much lesser degree surprise. The emotion of interest does have its own facial expression, of which the most prominent component is having dilated pupils.

                                               

The Simpsons

The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening for the Fox Broadcasting Company. The series is a satirical depiction of working-class life, epitomized by the Simpson family, which consists of Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. The show is set in the fictional town of Springfield and parodies American culture and society, television, and the human condition. The family was conceived by Groening shortly before a solicitation for a series of animated shorts with producer James L. Brooks. Groening created a dysfunctional family and named the characters after his own family members, substituting Bart for his own name. The shorts became a part of The Tracey Ullman Show on April 19, 1987. After three seasons, the sketch was developed into a half-hour prime time show and became Foxs first series to land in the Top 30 ratings in a season 1989–90. Since its debut on December 17, 1989, 678 episodes of The Simpsons have been broadcast. It is the longest-running American sitcom, and the longest-running American scripted primetime television series, both in terms of seasons and number of episodes. The Simpsons Movie, a feature-length film, was released in theaters worldwide on July 27, 2007, and grossed over $527 million. Then on October 30, 2007, a video game was released. The Simpsons was renewed on February 6, 2019 for a thirty-first and thirty-second season. The former began airing September 29, 2019 and will conclude in May 17, 2020, and the latter of which will contain the 700th episode. The Simpsons is a joint production by Gracie Films and 20th Century Fox Television and syndicated by 20th Television. The Simpsons received acclaim throughout its first nine or ten seasons, which are generally considered its "Golden Age". Time named it the 20th centurys best television series, and Erik Adams of The A.V. Club named it "televisions crowning achievement regardless of format". On January 14, 2000, the Simpson family was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. It has won dozens of awards since it debuted as a series, including 34 Primetime Emmy Awards, 34 Annie Awards, and a Peabody Award. Homers exclamatory catchphrase "Doh!" has been adopted into the English language, while The Simpsons has influenced many other later adult-oriented animated sitcoms. However, it has also been criticized for a perceived decline in quality over the years.

                                               

Perfume

Perfume is a mixture of fragrant essential oils or aroma compounds, fixatives and solvents, used to give the human body, animals, food, objects, and living-spaces an agreeable scent. It is usually in liquid form and used to give a pleasant scent to a persons body. Ancient texts and archaeological excavations show the use of perfumes in some of the earliest human civilizations. Modern perfumery began in the late 19th century with the commercial synthesis of aroma compounds such as vanillin or coumarin, which allowed for the composition of perfumes with smells previously unattainable solely from natural aromatics alone.

                                               

Batman

Batman is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The character was created by artist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger, and first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in 1939. Originally named the "Bat-Man," the character is also referred to by such epithets as the Caped Crusader, the Dark Knight, and the Worlds Greatest Detective. Batmans secret identity is Bruce Wayne, a wealthy American playboy, philanthropist, and owner of Wayne Enterprises. Batman originated from an incident in Bruces childhood; after witnessing the murder of his parents Dr. Thomas Wayne and Martha Wayne, he swore vengeance against criminals, an oath tempered by a sense of justice. Bruce trains himself physically and intellectually and crafts a bat-inspired persona to fight crime. Batman operates in the fictional Gotham City with assistance from various supporting characters, including his butler Alfred, police commissioner Jim Gordon, and vigilante allies such as Robin. Unlike most superheroes, Batman does not possess any inhuman superpowers. He does, however, possess a genius-level intellect and is a peerless martial artist, and his vast wealth affords him an extraordinary arsenal of weaponry and equipment. A large assortment of villains make up Batmans rogues gallery, including his nemesis, the Joker. The character became popular soon after his introduction in 1939 and gained his own comic book title, Batman, the following year. As the decades went on, different interpretations of the character emerged. The late 1960s Batman television series used a camp aesthetic, which continued to be associated with the character for years after the show ended. Various creators worked to return the character to his dark roots, culminating in 1986 with The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller. The success of Warner Bros. Pictures live-action Batman feature films have helped maintain the characters prominence in mainstream culture. Batman has been licensed and featured in various adaptations, from radio to television and film, and appears in merchandise sold around the world, such as apparel, toys, and video games. Kevin Conroy, Rino Romano, Anthony Ruivivar, Peter Weller, Bruce Greenwood, Jason OMara, and Will Arnett, among others, have provided the characters voice for animated adaptations. Batman has been depicted in both film and television by Lewis Wilson, Robert Lowery, Adam West, Michael Keaton, Val Kilmer, George Clooney, Bruce Thomas, Christian Bale, Ben Affleck, David Mazouz, Iain Glen, and Kevin Conroy. Robert Pattinson will portray the character in the upcoming 2021 film, The Batman.

                                               

Peter Parker: Spider-Man

Peter Parker: Spider-Man originally titled simply Spider-Man, was a monthly comic book series published by Marvel Comics that ran for 98 issues from 1990 to 1998. The series was retitled Peter Parker: Spider-Man with issue #75, but only on the covers, the series was still under its original Spider-Man title in the comics legal indicia, printed on the title page, from #75 to #98; the comic book would not officially be titled Peter Parker: Spider-Man until the volume 2 series relaunch. The series originally was conceived as a showcase for Todd McFarlane. McFarlane, who until then had only been known as an artist, was hugely popular at the time and the series was created by editor Jim Salicrup so that McFarlane could pencil, ink, and write a Spider-Man title of his own, starting with the "Torment" storyline. The series was a massive sales success with over 2.5 million copies printed. McFarlane stayed on the title until issue #16 November 1991 in which the story was printed in a landscape format. He created the character Spawn and help found Image Comics in 1992. He was succeeded on the title by Erik Larsen, who had succeeded McFarlane on The Amazing Spider-Man two years earlier, and would later join him in the founding of Image. Larsen wrote and drew the six-issue story arc "Revenge of the Sinister Six" #18–23. Writer Don McGregor and artist Marshall Rogers crafted a two-part story in issues #27–28 dealing with gun violence. After that came a quick procession of different contributors, including writers Tom DeFalco, Ann Nocenti, David Michelinie, J. M. DeMatteis, and Terry Kavanagh, and pencillers Ron Frenz, Klaus Janson, and Jae Lee. The rotating creative team was solidified with Spider-Man #44 March 1994 when writer Howard Mackie and penciller Tom Lyle took over the title; Lyle lasted until issue #61, and Mackie for over six years. The series played a key role throughout the "Clone Saga", becoming one of two Spider-Man titles that shifted focus to the new Ben Reilly Scarlet Spider character with issue #51 November 1994. The series run was interrupted by that saga in issues #63 and 64 Nov.–Dec. 1995, when the title was renumbered to #1 and renamed Scarlet Spider. Spider-Man resumed with #65 Jan. 1996, with Ben Reilly replacing Peter Parker as Spider-Man. Intended as a permanent change, Reillys status as the new Spider-Man was cut short when Bob Harras was named new Editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics in February 1996, and ordered the reinstatement of the characters Peter Parker identity. Spider-Man was the title which depicted this and in #75 December 1996, by Mackie and John Romita Jr., Ben Reilly was killed by the resurrected original Green Goblin – who had seemingly died in The Amazing Spider-Man #122 July 1973 – and Peter Parker returned to the role of Spider-Man. That same issue, the title of the series was changed to Peter Parker: Spider-Man to concretely establish that the original Spider-Man was being depicted. The series had a brief interlude in July 1997 with Marvels one-month "Flashback" event, when all Marvel titles were numbered −1 and each was set before the events of Fantastic Four #1. This #-1 was published between issues #81 and 82. The series then continued uninterrupted until the arrival of John Byrne to the Spider-Man titles heralded a relaunch of the entire line. The series was cancelled with #98 Nov. 1998 featuring part of "The Gathering of Five and The Final Chapter" storyline and relaunched as volume 2 almost immediately afterward.

                                               

X-Men

X-Men are a team of fictional mutant superheroes appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by artist/co-writer Jack Kirby and writer Stan Lee, the characters first appeared in The X-Men #1 and formed one of the most recognizable and successful franchises of Marvel Comics, appearing in numerous books, television shows, films, and video games. Most of the X-Men are mutants, a subspecies of humans who are born with superhuman abilities activated by the "X-Gene". The X-Men fight for peace and equality between normal humans and mutants in a world where anti-mutant bigotry is fierce and widespread. They are led by Charles Xavier, also known as Professor X, a powerful mutant telepath who can control and read minds. Their archenemy is Magneto, a powerful mutant with the ability to manipulate and control magnetic fields who leads the Brotherhood of Mutants. Both have opposing views and philosophies regarding the relationship between mutants and humans. While the former works towards peace and understanding between mutants and humans, the latter views humans as a threat and believes in taking an aggressive approach against them, though he has found himself working alongside the X-Men from time to time. Professor X is the founder of Xaviers School for Gifted Youngsters at a location commonly called the X-Mansion, which recruits mutants from around the world to teach them how to use their powers and coexist with humanity. Located in Salem Center in Westchester County, New York, the X-Mansion is the home and training site of the X-Men. The founding five members of the X-Men who appear in The X-Men #1 September 1963 are Angel-Archangel, Beast, Cyclops, Iceman and Jean Grey as Marvel Girl; Professor X and Magneto also made their first appearances in The X-Men #1 and later on new members such as Havok, Polaris, Mimic and Changeling joined though only the former two managed to become a regular recurring staple of the team lineup. Eventually more well known X-Men included Wolverine, Storm, Rogue, Gambit, Jubilee, Nightcrawler, Colossus, Kitty Pryde/Shadowcat, Psylocke and Bishop. Since then, dozens of mutants from various countries and diverse backgrounds, and even a number of non-mutants, have held membership as X-Men. The X-Men has appeared in a wide variety of media outside of comic books, including a number of different animated television series and direct-to-video films. Most notably, the superhero team is the predominant focus of the X-Men film series with each film drawing influences from the comic book storylines. After a decade of being overshadowed by the Avengers, in 2019 writer Jonathan Hickman helmed the Dawn of X relaunch of the X-Men, propelling them to the forefront of Marvel once again.

Interest
                                     

Interest

Interest, in finance and economics, is payment from a borrower or deposit-taking financial institution to a lender or depositor of an amount above repayment of the principal sum, at a particular rate. It is distinct from a fee which the borrower may pay the lender or some third party. It is also distinct from dividend which is paid by a company to its shareholders from its profit or reserve, but not at a particular rate decided beforehand, rather on a pro rata basis as a share in the reward gained by risk taking entrepreneurs when the revenue earned exceeds the total costs.

For example, a customer would usually pay interest to borrow from a bank, so they pay the bank an amount which is more than the amount they borrowed, or a customer may earn interest on their savings, and so they may withdraw more than they originally deposited. In the case of savings, the customer is the lender, and the bank plays the role of the borrower.

Interest differs from profit, in that interest is received by a lender, whereas profit is received by the owner of an asset, investment or enterprise. Interest may be part or the whole of the profit on an investment, but the two concepts are distinct from each other from an accounting perspective.

The rate of interest is equal to the interest amount paid or received over a particular period divided by in principal sum borrowed or lent usually expressed as a percentage.

Compound interest means that interest is earned on prior interest in addition to the principal. Due to compounding, the total amount of debt grows exponentially, and its mathematical study led to the discovery of the number e. In practice, interest is most often calculated on a daily, monthly, or yearly basis, and its impact is influenced greatly by its compounding rate.

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