Blog page 448




                                               

Ballot access

In the United States, ballot access refers to the rules and procedures regulating the conditions under which a candidate, political party, or ballot measure is entitled to appear on voters ballots. As the nations election process is decentralized ...

                                               

Voter caging

Voter caging is challenging the registration status of voters and calling into question the legality of allowing them to vote. Sometimes, it involves sending direct mail to the addresses of registered voters and compiling a list of addressees fro ...

                                               

Candidate

A candidate, or nominee, is the prospective recipient of an award or honor, or a person seeking or being considered for some kind of position; for example: to be elected to an office - in this case a candidate selection procedure occurs. to recei ...

                                               

Casual vacancy

In politics, a casual vacancy is a situation in which a seat in a deliberative assembly becomes vacant during that assemblys term. Casual vacancies may arise through the death, resignation or disqualification of the sitting member, for other reas ...

                                               

Cleavage (politics)

In political science, cleavage theory is the idea of a division of voters into voting blocs. The preliminary assumption is that voters do not come in predefined groups of pros and cons for or against a certain subject. Ballot analysis assumes tha ...

                                               

Co-option

Co-option has two common meanings. It may refer to the process of adding members to an elite group at the discretion of members of the body, usually to manage opposition and so maintain the stability of the group. Outsiders are co-opted’ by being ...

                                               

Competitiveness of elections

In American federal elections, races for U.S. Senate tend to be more competitive than those for U.S. House of Representatives. Even in wave election years, the vast majority of U.S. House members keep their seats, with little pressure from the op ...

                                               

Compulsory voting

Compulsory voting is an effect of laws which require eligible citizens to register and vote in elections, and may impose penalties on those who fail to do so. As of August 2013, 22 countries provided for compulsory voting, 11 of whom enforced it. ...

                                               

Concession (politics)

In politics, a concession is the act of a losing candidate publicly yielding to a winning candidate after an election after the overall result of the vote has become clear.

                                               

Constitutional liberalism

Constitutional liberalism describes a form of government that upholds the principles of classical liberalism and the rule of law. It differs from liberal democracy in that it is not about the method of selecting government. The journalist and sch ...

                                               

Coordination failure (political science)

Coordination failure is the electoral problem resulting from competition between two or more candidates or political parties from the same or approximate location in the political ideological spectrum or space against an opposing candidate or pol ...

                                               

Democracy

Democracy is a form of government in which the people exercise the authority of government. Who people are and how authority is shared among them are core issues for democratic development and constitution. Some cornerstones of these issues are f ...

                                               

Representative democracy

Representative democracy, also known as indirect democracy or representative government, is a type of democracy founded on the principle of elected officials representing a group of people, as opposed to direct democracy. Nearly all modern Wester ...

                                               

Dominant-party system

A dominant-party system, or one-party dominant system, is a system where there is "a category of parties/political organisations that have successively won election victories and whose future defeat cannot be envisaged or is unlikely for the fore ...

                                               

Drive-thru voting

Drive-Thru Voting describes the method of voting in an election whereby completed ballot papers submitted by placing them in a drop-box. Drive-thru voting is an alternative to having voters go in person to a polling station, vote electronically v ...

                                               

E2D International

E2D International is the political international of the Electronic Direct Democracy Party movement. The E2D Manifesto describes the basic political principles of E2D International member parties.

                                               

Early voting

Early voting is a process by which voters in a public election can vote prior to the scheduled election day. Early voting can take place remotely, such as via postal voting, or in person, usually in designated early voting polling stations. The a ...

                                               

Election address

An election address is the material sent out by a candidate during a political campaign. Election Addresses are normally only sent out during the election period itself. Other political leaflets are usually known by different names. In UK parliam ...

                                               

Election audit

An election audit is any review conducted after polls close for the purpose of determining whether the votes were counted accurately or whether proper procedures were followed, or both. Both results and process audits can be performed between ele ...

                                               

Election boycott

An election boycott is the boycotting of an election by a group of voters, each of whom abstains from voting. Boycotting may be used as a form of political protest where voters feel that electoral fraud is likely, or that the electoral system is ...

                                               

Election commission

An election commission is a body charged with overseeing the implementation of electioneering process of any country. The formal names of election commissions vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, and may be styled an electoral commission, a ce ...

                                               

Election day

Election day or polling day is the day on which general elections are held. In many countries, general elections are always held on a Saturday or Sunday, to enable as many voters as possible to participate; while in other countries elections are ...

                                               

Election deposit

In an electoral system, a deposit is the sum of money that a candidate for an elected office, such as a seat in a legislature, is required to pay to an electoral authority before he or she is permitted to stand for election. In the typical case, ...

                                               

Election in absentia

In parliamentary procedure, election in absentia refers to the election of a presiding officer of a committee or assembly, when the person is not present. More broadly, in the context of an election it may be used to refer to a candidate who is n ...

                                               

Election official

An election official, election officer, election judge, election clerk, or poll worker is an official responsible for the proper and orderly voting at polling stations. Depending on the country or jurisdiction, election officials may be identifie ...

                                               

Election recount

An election recount is a repeat tabulation of votes cast in an election that is used to determine the correctness of an initial count. Recounts will often take place if the initial vote tally during an election is extremely close. Election recoun ...

                                               

Election security

Election cybersecurity or election security refers to the protection of elections and voting infrastructure from cyberattack or cyber threat – including the tampering with or infiltration of voting machines and equipment, election office networks ...

                                               

Election surprise

An election surprise is an event which occurs preceding an election which has enough shock value that it may be able to sway voters in close elections. When planned, an election surprise may be an act of propaganda. Election surprises typically f ...

                                               

Election verification exit poll

An election verification exit poll is a relatively new concept in polling, intended to improve the accuracy of exit polls to such an extent that they can be used to verify election results. Traditional exit polling relies on small samples, wheres ...

                                               

Electoral college

An electoral college is a set of electors who are selected to elect a candidate to a particular office. Often these represent different organizations, political parties, or entities, with each organization, political party or entity represented b ...

                                               

Electoral district

An electoral district, also known as an election district, legislative district, voting district, constituency, riding, ward, division, precinct, electoral area, circumscription, or electorate, is an administrative subdivision of a larger state c ...

                                               

Electoral geography

Electoral geography is the analysis of the methods, the behavior, and the results of elections in the context of geographic space and using geographical techniques. Specifically, it is an examination of the dual interaction in which geographical ...

                                               

Electoral Headhunter

The Electoral Headhunter or Koppensneller is a special type of Voting Advice Application, providing a voting advice for several elections such as province and national elections in the Netherlands, the 2014 Dutch European Parliament Elections and ...

                                               

Electoral integrity

Electoral integrity refers to international standards and global norms governing the appropriate conduct of elections. These standards have been endorsed in a series of authoritative conventions, treaties, protocols, and guidelines by agencies of ...

                                               

Electoral Integrity Project

The Electoral Integrity Project is an academic project based at Harvard University and the University of Sydney which seeks to quantify the integrity of elections worldwide. The project freely publishes its Perceptions of Electoral Integrity data ...

                                               

Electoral list

An electoral list is a grouping of candidates for election, usually in proportional electoral systems, but also in some plurality electoral systems. An electoral list can be registered by a political party or can constitute a group of independent ...

                                               

Electoral symbol

An electoral symbol is a standardised symbol allocated to a political party. Symbols are used by parties in their campaigning, and printed on ballot papers where a voter must make a mark to vote for the associated party. Their purpose is to facil ...

                                               

Electoral system

An electoral system or voting system is a set of rules that determine how elections and referendums are conducted and how their results are determined. Political electoral systems are organized by governments, while non-political elections may ta ...

                                               

Electoralism

Electoralism is a term first used by Terry Karl, professor of political science at Stanford University, to describe a "half-way" transition from authoritarian rule toward democratic rule. As a topic in the dominant party system political science ...

                                               

Electronic pollbook

An electronic pollbook, also known as an e-poll book, is typically either hardware, software or a combination of the two that allows election officials to review and/or maintain voter register information for an election, but does not actually co ...

                                               

Entrance poll

An entrance poll is a poll that is taken before voters have cast their votes at the polling stations. They are mainly used in caucuses. It is akin to an opinion poll in the sense that it asks who the voter plans to vote for or some similar set of ...

                                               

Eurasian Observatory for Democracy and Elections

Eurasian Observatory for Democracy and Elections is a Russia-based Eurasianist non-governmental organization which on its website claims that it monitors elections. According to its website, it specializes in the "self-proclaimed republics". It i ...

                                               

Exit poll

An election exit poll is a poll of voters taken immediately after they have exited the polling stations. A similar poll conducted before actual voters have voted is called an entrance poll. Pollsters – usually private companies working for newspa ...

                                               

Front-runner

In American politics, a front-runner is a leader in an electoral race. While the front-runner in athletic events is generally clear, a political front-runner, particularly in the presidential primary process, is less so as a potential nominee may ...

                                               

Full slate

Any political party or faction that seeks to form a majority in a parliament or on a board of directors or other responsible body typically must run a full slate if only to demonstrate that they have the capacity to attract the talent to fill eve ...

                                               

General election

A general election is a political voting election where generally all or most members of a given political body are chosen. These are usually held for a nations primary legislative body, as distinguished from by-elections and local elections. In ...

                                               

Grassroots fundraising

Grassroots fundraising is a common fundraising method used by political candidates, which has grown in popularity with the emergence of the Internet and its use by US presidential candidates like Howard Dean, Barack Obama, Ron Paul, and most rece ...

                                               

Hereditary politicians

Hereditary politician refers to politicians whose political position can be seen as being conferred by or based on inheritance from a parent or grandparent in some sense. It should not be confused with political dynasty though these two concepts ...

                                               

Householder Franchise

Householder Franchise or census suffrage is where a homeowner has the right to vote in an election. This is a limited form of suffrage, but different from equal voting because, to borrow a dictum, householder franchise is one Household, one vote ...

                                               

Husting

A hustings originally referred to a native Germanic governing assembly, the thing. By metonymy, the term may now refer to any event, such as debates or speeches, during an election campaign where one or more of the representative candidates are p ...