Blog page 376




                                               

Balanced sentence

"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times." A Tale of Two Cities From Abraham Lincolns 1863 Gettysburg Address, two powerful examples: "But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate - we cannot consecrate - we cannot hallow - this ground." ...

                                               

Clandestine literature

Clandestine literature, also called "underground literature", refers to a type of editorial and publishing process that involves self-publishing works, often in contradiction with the legal standards of a location. Clandestine literature is often ...

                                               

Classic book

A classic is a book accepted as being exemplary or noteworthy, for example through an imprimatur such as being listed in a list of great books, or through a readers personal opinion. Although the term is often associated with the Western canon, i ...

                                               

Comedy of menace

Comedy of menace is the body of plays written by David Campton, Nigel Dennis, N. F. Simpson, and Harold Pinter. The term was coined by drama critic Irving Wardle, who borrowed it from the subtitle of Camptons play The Lunatic View: A Comedy of Me ...

                                               

Conclusion (book)

In a non-fiction book, a conclusion is an ending section which states the concluding ideas and concepts of the preceding writing. This generally follows the body or perhaps an afterword, and the conclusion may be followed by an epilogue, outro, p ...

                                               

Conte cruel

The conte cruel is, as The A to Z of Fantasy Literature by Brian Stableford states, a "short-story genre that takes its name from an 1883 collection by Villiers de lIsle-Adam, although previous examples had been provided by such writers as Edgar ...

                                               

Critical lens

A critical lens is a way of looking at a particular work of literature by focusing on style choices, plot devices, and character interactions and how they show a certain theme. It is a common literary analysis technique.

                                               

Literary cycle

A literary cycle is a group of stories focused on common figures, often based on mythical figures or loosely on historical ones. Cycles which deal with an entire country are sometimes referred to as matters. A fictional cycle is often referred to ...

                                               

Dedication (publishing)

A dedication is the expression of friendly connection or thanks by the author towards another person. The dedication has its own place on the dedication page and is part of the front matter.

                                               

Domestic realism

Domestic realism normally refers to the genre of 19th-century novels popular with women readers. This body of writing is also known as "sentimental fiction" or "womans fiction". The genre is mainly reflected in the novel though short-stories and ...

                                               

Dual narrative

A dual narrative is a form of narrative that tells a story in two different perspectives, usually two different people. Dual narrative is also an effective technique that can be used to tell the story of people at two different points in time. It ...

                                               

Elementary realism

The realism is derived from real word. This school emerged in the nineteenth century. The realism is based on realism and the subject was made in contemporary society. The emergence factors of This school include: 1. The not-so-famous writers and ...

                                               

Empirical study of literature

The empirical study of literature is an interdisciplinary field of research which includes the psychology, sociology, Philosophy, the contextual study of literature, and the history of reading literary texts. The International Society for the Emp ...

                                               

Epigraph (literature)

In literature, an epigraph is a phrase, quotation, or poem that is set at the beginning of a document, monograph or section thereof. The epigraph may serve as a preface to the work; as a summary; as a counter-example; or as a link from the work t ...

                                               

Epilogue

An epilogue or epilog is a piece of writing at the end of a work of literature, usually used to bring closure to the work. It is presented from the perspective of within the story. When the author steps in and speaks directly to the reader, that ...

                                               

Epiphany (literature)

Epiphany in literature refers generally to a visionary moment, when a character has a sudden insight or realization that changes his or her understanding of themselves or their comprehension of the world. The term has a more specialized sense as ...

                                               

Epistle

An epistle is a writing directed or sent to a person or group of people, usually an elegant and formal didactic letter. The epistle genre of letter-writing was common in ancient Egypt as part of the scribal-school writing curriculum. The letters ...

                                               

Etat second

Etat second refers the state of mind into which some French authors go when writing short stories. It mixes abstraction and concentration at the same time, ironically telling sometimes more facts than in conscious writing. The Argentine writer Ju ...

                                               

Extant literature

Extant literature and extant music refers to texts or music that has survived from the past to the present time, as opposed to lost work. Extant literature can be divided into extant original manuscripts, copies of original manuscripts, quotation ...

                                               

Fictional portrayals of psychopaths

Fictional portrayals of psychopaths, or sociopaths, are some of the most notorious in film and literature but may only vaguely or partly relate to the concept of psychopathy, which is itself used with varying definitions by mental health professi ...

                                               

Foreword

A foreword is a piece of writing sometimes placed at the beginning of a book or other piece of literature. Typically written by someone other than the primary author of the work, it often tells of some interaction between the writer of the forewo ...

                                               

Futurism (literature)

Futurism is a modernist avant-garde movement in literature and part of the Futurism art movement that originated in Italy in the early 20th century. It made its official literature debut with the publication of Filippo Tommaso Marinettis Manifest ...

                                               

Imagery

Imagery, in a literary text, is an authors use of vivid and descriptive language to add depth to their work. Sensory imagery appeals to human senses to deepen the readers understanding of the work. Powerful forms of imagery engage all of the senses.

                                               

Inclusio

In biblical studies, inclusio is a literary device based on a concentric principle, also known as bracketing or an envelope structure, which consists of creating a frame by placing similar material at the beginning and end of a section, although ...

                                               

Indie literature

The National Literary Awards defines independent or "indie" literature as "books published outside mainstream publishing." Such books are rarely recognized and hard to pin down, but some examples include "Damastor" by Dimitri Iatrou, "Returning H ...

                                               

Interstitial art

Interstitial art is any work of art whose basic nature falls between, rather than within, the familiar boundaries of accepted genres or media, thus making the work difficult to categorize or describe within a single artistic discipline.

                                               

Introduction (writing)

In an essay, article, or book, an introduction is a beginning section which states the purpose and goals of the following writing. This is generally followed by the body and conclusion. The introduction typically describes the scope of the docume ...

                                               

Literary language

A literary language is the form of a language used in its literary writing. It can be either a non-standard dialect or standardized variety of the language. It can sometimes differ noticeably from the various spoken lects, but difference between ...

                                               

Lead paragraph

A lead paragraph is the opening paragraph of an article, essay, book chapter, or other written work that summarizes its main ideas. Styles vary widely among the different types and genres of publications, from journalistic news-style leads to a m ...

                                               

Liberature

Liberature refers to a new kind of literature, a trans-genre, in which the text and the material form of a book constitute an inseparable whole. The term itself is derived from the word literature’, but draws from the Latin liber, meaning "a book ...

                                               

Literary fragment

Literary fragments may comprise: surviving extracts of larger works subsequently lost as wholes works deliberately constructed as fragmentary pieces works inadvertently left unfinished or never completed by their authors The deliberately undevelo ...

                                               

Literary space

According to Mieczyslaw Porebski space can be divided into three types, namely, extratextual, intertextual and intratextual. The first is where works of art are stored. It is physical, 3-dimensional and, therefore, can be experienced by readers e ...

                                               

Miscellany

A miscellany is a collection of various pieces of writing by different authors. Meaning a mixture, medley, or assortment, a miscellany can include pieces on many subjects and in a variety of different forms. In contrast to anthologies, whose aim ...

                                               

Moral

A moral is a message that is conveyed or a lesson to be learned from a story or event. The moral may be left to the hearer, reader, or viewer to determine for themselves, or may be explicitly encapsulated in a maxim. A moral is a lesson in a stor ...

                                               

Narratology

Narratology is the study of narrative and narrative structure and the ways that these affect human perception. It is an anglicisation of French narratologie, coined by Tzvetan Todorov. Its theoretical lineage is traceable to Aristotle but modern ...

                                               

Outdoor literature

Outdoor literature is a literature genre about or involving the outdoors. Outdoor literature encompasses several different subgenres including exploration literature, adventure literature, mountain literature and nature writing. Another subgenre ...

                                               

Page 99 test

The page 99 test is a method of evaluating a work of fiction suggested by literary critic Ford Madox Ford. Ford suggested that prospective readers open a book and read page 99 to gain a sense of how well written the work is while avoiding any bac ...

                                               

Pan-national epic

A national epic is an epic poem or a literary work of epic scope which seeks or is believed to capture and express the essence or spirit of a particular nation; not necessarily a nation state, but at least an ethnic or linguistic group with aspir ...

                                               

Paraliterature

Paraliterature comprises written works dismissed as not literary. It includes commercial fiction, popular fiction, pulp fiction, comic books and, most notably, genre fiction with works of science fiction, fantasy, mystery and others.:361

                                               

Perverse incentive

A perverse incentive is an incentive that has an unintended and undesirable result which is contrary to the intentions of its designers. Perverse incentives are a type of negative unintended consequence. A classic example of a perverse incentive ...

                                               

Poetics

The term "poetics" comes from the Greek ποιητικός poietikos "pertaining to poetry," literally "creative, productive," from ποιητός poietos "made," verbal adjective of ποιεῖν poiein "to make." Scholar T. V. F. Brogan identifies three major movemen ...

                                               

Popular history

Popular history is a broad and somewhat ill-defined genre of historiography that takes a popular approach, aims at a wide readership, and usually emphasizes narrative, personality and vivid detail over scholarly analysis. The term is used in cont ...

                                               

Portrait (literature)

The portrait is a literary genre derived from pictorial portraiture. The imitation of painting is apparent in the name of the genre itself, which is a painting term. Historians of antiquity recognised the task of the portrait as representation; w ...

                                               

Postcolonial literature

Post-colonialism is a broad cultural approach to the study of power relations between different groups, cultures or people, in which language, literature and translation play role Postcolonial literature is the literature by people from formerly ...

                                               

Print disability

A print-disabled person is "a person who cannot effectively read print because of a visual, physical, perceptual, developmental, cognitive, or learning disability". A print disability prevents a person from gaining information from printed materi ...

                                               

Prologue

A prologue or prolog is an opening to a story that establishes the context and gives background details, often some earlier story that ties into the main one, and other miscellaneous information. The Ancient Greek prologos included the modern mea ...

                                               

Sensibility

Sensibility refers to an acute perception of or responsiveness toward something, such as the emotions of another. This concept emerged in eighteenth-century Britain, and was closely associated with studies of sense perception as the means through ...

                                               

Serial (literature)

In literature, a serial is a printing format by which a single larger work, often a work of narrative fiction, is published in smaller, sequential installments. The installments are also known as numbers, parts or fascicles, and may be released e ...

                                               

Sociology of literature

The sociology of literature is a subfield of the sociology of culture. It studies the social production of literature and its social implications. A notable example is Pierre Bourdieus 1992 Les Regles de LArt: Genese et Structure du Champ Littera ...

                                               

Soliloquy

A soliloquy is a device often used in drama when a character speaks to themselves, relating thoughts and feelings, thereby also sharing them with the audience, giving the illusion of unspoken reflections. If other characters are present, they kee ...